Identification

Summary

Peanut oil is a compound used to lubricate ear wax, as an emollient, and used in laxatives.

Generic Name
Peanut oil
DrugBank Accession Number
DB13964
Background

Peanut oil is derived from Arachis hypogaea which can be found in South America, Mexico, and Centro America. The kernels are consumed roasted but a large percentage is used for the production of vegetable oil. The peanut oil represents about 45-52% of the kernel content and it is mainly formed from monounsaturated fat from which the major component is Oleic Acid.1 Under the FDA, peanut oil is categorized as an approved inactive ingredient for its use in drug products.8 Under Health Canada, it is approved as an active ingredient in over-the-counter combination products.9

Type
Biotech
Groups
Approved
Synonyms
  • Arachis oil
  • Earthnut oil
  • Groundnut oil
  • Indigenous peanut oil
  • Oils, peanut
  • Peanut oil

Pharmacology

Indication

Peanut oil is widely used in food and it is even the component for the adulteration of olive oil.3 It is used in over-the-counter ear drops to help lubricate the ear wax.13 It was also used as an ingredient in cleansing soaps, in emollient cream preparations or in laxatives.10,14

Peanut oil is also used usually to solubilize drugs with poor water solubility as part of the oral formulation.4

When orally administered, peanut oil has as well been researched and used to prevent heart diseases and lower cholesterol levels as well as to aid in weight loss and decrease appetite.12

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Associated Conditions
Contraindications & Blackbox Warnings
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Pharmacodynamics

Studies comparing the effectiveness between water-based and oil-based cerumenolytics have not been informative enough. However, most of the studies have concluded that both types of ear drops are as effective to remove the wax block and the use of this agents is preferred above the mechanical removal.5

Topically administered, peanut oil effect can be observed as a softening and protection of the skin.6

Some population studies suggest people who eat nuts have a lower risk of developing heart disease. This benefit must be weighed against animal evidence that suggests peanut oil is atherogenic, perhaps due to the triglyceride content or the presence of a lectin.12

Mechanism of action

When used in laxatives, peanut oil lubricates and softness the feces which promotes bowel movement.10

Ear drops containing peanut oil are usually considered a not "true cerumenolytic". A cerumenolytic causes the breakdown of keratin and wax but the oil-based cerumenolytics only soften and lubricate the wax. The peanut oil contained in this cerumenolytics serve as lubricating agents.5

Administered topically, peanut oil acts as an emollient which acts by forming an occlusive oil film on the stratum corneum which in order decreases the transepidermal water loss.6

The use of peanut oil as a cardioprotective strives in the presence of beta-Sitosterol and Resveratrol. As well, the presence of high monounsaturated and low saturated fat content is thought to prevent heart disease and lower cholesterol.12

Absorption

The exact pharmacokinetic of peanut oil highly depends on the route of administration. Peanut oil presents a very short spam in the blood and thus, it is normally rapidly transported to the muscle and adipose tissues where it can rest over a longer period. Peanut oil is absorbed through the skin and the absorption rate depends on the size of the individual molecules, the percentage of essential oils, total dosage, and circulation state. However, the absorption after administration orally or in the mucosa is much more rapid.7 To know more about the pharmacokinetics of peanut oil, please visit Oleic Acid as it is its main component.

Volume of distribution

The exact pharmacokinetic of peanut oil highly depends on the route of administration. To know more about the pharmacokinetics of peanut oil, please visit Oleic Acid as it is its main component.

Protein binding

The exact pharmacokinetic of peanut oil highly depends on the route of administration. Peanut oil might bind to plasma proteins for transportation and detoxification and this binding occurs mainly in the liver.7 To know more about the pharmacokinetics of peanut oil, please visit Oleic Acid as it is its main component.

Metabolism

The exact pharmacokinetic of peanut oil highly depends on the route of administration. Some studies suggest that the metabolism and elimination of this agent can be done between 72 and 120 hours after administration depending on some characteristics such as body size, carrier substance, administration route, dose and health status.7 To know more about the pharmacokinetics of peanut oil, please visit Oleic Acid as it is its main component.

Route of elimination

The exact pharmacokinetic of peanut oil highly depends on the route of administration. Some studies suggest that the metabolism and elimination of this agent can be done between 72 and 120 hours after administration depending on some characteristics such as body size, carrier substance, administration route, dose and health status.7 To know more about the pharmacokinetics of peanut oil, please visit Oleic Acid as it is its main component.

Half-life

The exact pharmacokinetic of peanut oil highly depends on the route of administration.

Clearance

The exact pharmacokinetic of peanut oil highly depends on the route of administration.

Adverse Effects
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Toxicity

The use of peanut oil must be very well labeled as individuals with peanut allergy can have a severe allergic reaction. The reactions can develop to anaphylactic reactions within minutes of the initial administration.2

Pathways
Not Available
Pharmacogenomic Effects/ADRs
Not Available

Interactions

Drug Interactions
This information should not be interpreted without the help of a healthcare provider. If you believe you are experiencing an interaction, contact a healthcare provider immediately. The absence of an interaction does not necessarily mean no interactions exist.
Not Available
Food Interactions
No interactions found.

Products

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Over the Counter Products
NameDosageStrengthRouteLabellerMarketing StartMarketing EndRegionImage
Oilatum SoapSoap7.5 %TopicalStiefel Laboratories, Inc.1966-12-311998-07-09Canada flag
Oilatum Soap - 2%Soap2 %TopicalStiefel Laboratories, Inc.1995-12-311998-09-14Canada flag
Mixture Products
NameIngredientsDosageRouteLabellerMarketing StartMarketing EndRegionImage
CerumolPeanut oil (57 %) + Chlorobutanol (5 %) + Dichlorobenzene (2 %) + Turpentine oil (10 %)Solution / dropsAuricular (otic)Thornton & Ross Ltd1971-12-31Not applicableCanada flag

Categories

Drug Categories
Classification
Not classified
Affected organisms
Not Available

Chemical Identifiers

UNII
5TL50QU0W4
CAS number
8002-03-7

References

General References
  1. Ozcan MM: Some nutritional characteristics of kernel and oil of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.). J Oleo Sci. 2010;59(1):1-5. [Article]
  2. Al-Muhsen S, Clarke AE, Kagan RS: Peanut allergy: an overview. CMAJ. 2003 May 13;168(10):1279-85. [Article]
  3. Iris F. F. Benzie, Sissi Wachtel-Galor (2011). Herbal Medicine: Biomolecular and Clinical Aspects (2nd ed.). CRC Press/Taylor & Francis. [ISBN:978-1-4398-0713-2]
  4. Bailey J. (1991). Prostaglandins, leukotrienes, lipoxins and PAF. Springer. [ISBN:978-1-4899-0729-5]
  5. Roland P. (2008). Otolaryngology: Head and Neck Surgery. J. Othons.
  6. Mueller R (2008). Small Animal Clinical Pharmacology. Elsevier.
  7. Braun L. and Cohen M. (2010). Herbs & Natural Supplement: An evidence-based guide. Elsevier.
  8. FDA Inactive ingredient search [Link]
  9. Health Canada [Link]
  10. Oilatum [Link]
  11. OLEIC ACID - National Library of Medicine HSDB Database - Toxnet [Link]
  12. Natural Medicines [Link]
  13. Cerumol [File]
  14. Emolients [File]
RxNav
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Wikipedia
Peanut_oil
MSDS
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Clinical Trials

Clinical Trials
PhaseStatusPurposeConditionsCount

Pharmacoeconomics

Manufacturers
Not Available
Packagers
Not Available
Dosage Forms
FormRouteStrength
Solution100 mg/1ml
Solution / dropsAuricular (otic)
SoapTopical7.5 %
SoapTopical2 %
Prices
Not Available
Patents
Not Available

Properties

State
Liquid
Experimental Properties
PropertyValueSource
melting point (°C)-5 ºC'MSDS'
boiling point (°C)160 ºCSmoke point of oils
water solubilityInsoluble'MSDS'

Drug created at January 17, 2018 17:56 / Updated at May 28, 2022 06:24