Identification

Name
Vancomycin
Accession Number
DB00512
Description

Antibacterial obtained from Streptomyces orientalis. It is a glycopeptide related to ristocetin that inhibits bacterial cell wall assembly and is toxic to kidneys and the inner ear.

As of January 29 2018, CutisPharma's Firvanq is the only FDA approved vancomycin oral liquid treatment option available for the the treatment of Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea and enterocolitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant strains [LP1196]. Such an oral liquid formulation is expected to make Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea therapy more accessible in comparison to previously available specialty compounding products [LP1196].

Type
Small Molecule
Groups
Approved
Structure
Thumb
Weight
Average: 1449.254
Monoisotopic: 1447.430199787
Chemical Formula
C66H75Cl2N9O24
Synonyms
  • Vancomicina
  • Vancomycin
  • Vancomycine
  • Vancomycinum

Pharmacology

Indication

A variety of dosage forms (for example, oral, injections, etc.) exist for the treatment of serious or severe infections caused by susceptible strains of methicillin-resistant (beta-lactam-resistant) staphylococci Label.

Additionally, a unique FDA approved oral liquid treatment is also available and indicated for the treatment of Clostridium difficile associated diarrhea and enterocolitis caused by Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant strains 9.

Associated Conditions
Contraindications & Blackbox Warnings
Learn about our commercial Contraindications & Blackbox Warnings data.
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Pharmacodynamics

Vancomycin is a branched tricyclic glycosylated nonribosomal peptide often reserved as the "drug of last resort", used only after treatment with other antibiotics has failed. Vancomycin has been shown to be active against most strains of the following microorganisms, both in vitro and in clinical infections: Listeria monocytogenes, Streptococcus pyogenes, Streptococcus pneumoniae (including penicillin-resistant strains), Streptococcus agalactiae, Actinomyces species, and Lactobacillus species. The combination of vancomycin and an aminoglycoside acts synergistically in vitro against many strains of Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus bovis, enterococci, and the viridans group streptococci Label.

Mechanism of action

The bactericidal action of vancomycin results primarily from inhibition of cell-wall biosynthesis. Specifically, vancomycin prevents incorporation of N-acetylmuramic acid (NAM)- and N-acetylglucosamine (NAG)-peptide subunits from being incorporated into the peptidoglycan matrix, which forms the major structural component of Gram-positive cell walls. Vancomycin forms hydrogen bonds with the terminal D-alanyl-D-alanine moieties of the NAM/NAG-peptides, preventing the incorporation of the NAM/NAG-peptide subunits into the peptidoglycan matrix. In addition, vancomycin alters bacterial-cell-membrane permeability and RNA synthesis. There is no cross-resistance between vancomycin and other antibiotics. Vancomycin is not active in vitro against gram-negative bacilli, mycobacteria, or fungi. Label

TargetActionsOrganism
AD-Ala-D-Ala moiety of NAM/NAG peptide subunits of peptidoglycan
ligand
Gram-positive Bacteria
Absorption

Poorly absorbed from gastrointestinal tract, however systemic absorption (up to 60%) may occur following intraperitoneal administration Label.

Volume of distribution

The volume of distribution, as discussed in the literature, varies between 0.4-1 L/kg 6.

Protein binding

Approximately 50% serum protein bound 7.

Metabolism

Since almost 75-80% of the drug is excreted unchanged in the urine after the first 24 hours following administration, there is seemingly no apparent metabolism of the drug Label,8. The concentration of vancomycin in the liver tissue and bile 24 hours after administration has also been reported at or below detection limits as well 8.

Route of elimination

In the first 24 hours, about 75-80% of an administered dose of vancomycin is excreted in urine by glomerular filtration Label,8.

Half-life

Half-life in normal renal patients is approximately 6 hours (range 4 to 11 hours). In anephric patients, the average half-life of elimination is 7.5 days Label.

Clearance

The mean plasma clearance of vancomycin is about 0.058 L/kg/h Label.

Adverse Effects
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Toxicity

The oral LD50 in mice is 5000 mg/kg. The median lethal intravenous dose is 319 mg/kg in rats and 400 mg/kg in mice. Label

Conversely, the most common adverse effects associated with vancomycin appear to be nausea, abdominal pain, and hypokalemia Label. In particular, incidences of hypokalemia, urinary tracy infection, peripheral edema, insomnia, constipation, anemia, depression, vomiting, and hypotension are higher among subjects >65 years of than in those that are 65 years old or younger Label.

Additionally, nephrotoxicity involving reports of renal failure, renal impairment, elevated blood creatinine, and others has also occurred with vancomycin therapy during studies, and can occur during or after completion of a course of therapy Label. Risk of such nephrotoxicity is increased in patients greater than 65 years of age Label.

Ototoxicity has also occurred in patients receiving vancomycin treatment, and it can be transient or permanent. This effect has been reported primarily in patients who have been given excessive intravenous doses, who have kidney dysfunction, who have an underlying hearing loss, or who are receiving concomitant therapy with another ototoxic agent like an aminoglycoside Label. Potentially related adverse effects like vertigo, dizziness, and tinnitus have also been reported Label.

Neutropenia, often beginning one week or more after onset of intravenous vancomycin therapy or after a total dose of more than 25 mg has been observed for several dozen patients as well. This neutropenia however, appears to be promptly reversible when the vancomycin treatment is discontinued. Alternatively, thrombocytopenia has also been reported Label.

Additionally, a condition has been reported that is described as being similar to IV-induced symptoms involving symptoms consistent with anaphylactoid reactions, including hypotension, wheezing, dyspnea, urticaria, pruritus, flushing of the upper body (in what is known as the so-called 'Red Man Syndrome'), pain and muscle spasm of the chest and back. Although on average such reactions usually resolve within 20 minutes, they are just as likely to persist for hours Label,4.

In a controlled clinical study, the potential ototoxic and nephrotoxic effects of vancomycin on infants were assessed when the drug was given intravenously to pregnant women for serious staphylococcal infections complicating intravenous drug abuse. The results obtained demonstrated that vancomycin was found in cord blood but that no sensorineural hearing loss or nephrotoxicity attributable to vancomycin was noted. Ultimately however, because the number of subjects treated in this study was limited and vancomycin was administered only in the second and third trimesters, it is not formally known whether vancomycin causes fetal harm. Subsequently, vancomycin should be given to a pregnant woman only if clearly needed Label.

Although it is known that vancomycin is excreted in human milk based on information obtained from the intravenous administration of the medication, it is not known if vancomycin is excreted into human milk after oral administration. However, because of the overall potential for adverse events, caution must be exercised when vancomycin is given to a nursing woman and a decision must be made whether to discontinue nursing or discontinue the drug, taking into consideration the importance of the drug to the mother Label.

The safety and effectiveness in pediatric patients have not been formally established Label.

Patients older than 65 years of age may take longer to respond to therapy compared to patients aged 65 year or younger. Vancomycin treatment in patients aged older than 65 years subsequently should not be discontinued or switched to an alternative treatment prematurely Label.

Furthermore, clinical studies have demonstrated that geriatric patients are at increased risk of developing nephrotoxicity following treatment with oral vancomycin, which can occur during or after completion of therapy. In patients aged older than 65 years, including those with normal renal function prior to treatment, renal function should be monitored during and following treatment with vancomycin to detect any potential vancomycin induced nephrotoxicity Label.

Affected organisms
  • Enteric bacteria and other eubacteria
  • Corynebacterium diphtheriae
  • Treponema pallidum
  • Streptococcus pyogenes
  • Chlamydia pneumoniae
  • Chlamydia trachomatis
  • Mycoplasma pneumoniae
  • Neisseria gonorrhoeae
  • Legionella pneumophila
  • Chlamydia psittaci
  • Bordetella pertussis
Pathways
Not Available
Pharmacogenomic Effects/ADRs
Not Available

Interactions

Drug Interactions
This information should not be interpreted without the help of a healthcare provider. If you believe you are experiencing an interaction, contact a healthcare provider immediately. The absence of an interaction does not necessarily mean no interactions exist.
DrugInteraction
AbacavirAbacavir may decrease the excretion rate of Vancomycin which could result in a higher serum level.
AcarboseAcarbose may decrease the excretion rate of Vancomycin which could result in a higher serum level.
AceclofenacAceclofenac may decrease the excretion rate of Vancomycin which could result in a higher serum level.
AcemetacinAcemetacin may decrease the excretion rate of Vancomycin which could result in a higher serum level.
AcenocoumarolThe risk or severity of bleeding can be increased when Vancomycin is combined with Acenocoumarol.
AcetaminophenAcetaminophen may decrease the excretion rate of Vancomycin which could result in a higher serum level.
AcetazolamideAcetazolamide may increase the excretion rate of Vancomycin which could result in a lower serum level and potentially a reduction in efficacy.
Acetylsalicylic acidAcetylsalicylic acid may decrease the excretion rate of Vancomycin which could result in a higher serum level.
AclidiniumAclidinium may decrease the excretion rate of Vancomycin which could result in a higher serum level.
AcrivastineAcrivastine may decrease the excretion rate of Vancomycin which could result in a higher serum level.
Additional Data Available
  • Extended Description
    Extended Description

    Extended description of the mechanism of action and particular properties of each drug interaction.

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  • Severity
    Severity

    A severity rating for each drug interaction, from minor to major.

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  • Evidence Level
    Evidence Level

    A rating for the strength of the evidence supporting each drug interaction.

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  • Action
    Action

    An effect category for each drug interaction. Know how this interaction affects the subject drug.

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Food Interactions
  • Take with or without food.

Products

Product Ingredients
IngredientUNIICASInChI Key
Vancomycin hydrochloride71WO621TJD1404-93-9LCTORFDMHNKUSG-XTTLPDOESA-N
Product Images
International/Other Brands
COVANC (Nucleus) / Vancoled
Brand Name Prescription Products
NameDosageStrengthRouteLabellerMarketing StartMarketing EndRegionImage
Firvanq1 g/1gOralAzurity Pharmaceuticals, Inc2018-01-26Not applicableUS flag
FirvanqKit1 g/1gOralCutisPharma, Inc.2018-01-26Not applicableUS flag
Firvanq1 g/1gOralAzurity Pharmaceuticals, Inc2018-01-26Not applicableUS flag
Firvanq1 g/1gOralAzurity Pharmaceuticals, Inc2018-01-26Not applicableUS flag
Firvanq1 g/1gOralAzurity Pharmaceuticals, Inc2018-01-26Not applicableUS flag
FirvanqKit1 g/1gOralCutisPharma, Inc.2018-01-26Not applicableUS flag
Sterile Vancomycin HCl 5.0gm/vialPowder, for solutionIntravenousLyphomed, Division Of Fujisawa Canada Inc.1992-12-311996-09-10Canada flag
Sterile Vancomycin HCl USP 1.0gm/vialPowder, for solutionIntravenousLyphomed, Division Of Fujisawa Canada Inc.1992-12-311996-09-10Canada flag
Sterile Vancomycin HCl USP 500mg/vialPowder, for solutionIntravenousLyphomed, Division Of Fujisawa Canada Inc.1992-12-311996-09-10Canada flag
Sterile Vancomycin Hydrochloride, USPPowder, for solutionIntravenousPartners Health Care, Inc.1987-12-312008-02-15Canada flag
Additional Data Available
  • Application Number
    Application Number

    A unique ID assigned by the FDA when a product is submitted for approval by the labeller.

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  • Product Code
    Product Code

    A governmentally-recognized ID which uniquely identifies the product within its regulatory market.

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Generic Prescription Products
NameDosageStrengthRouteLabellerMarketing StartMarketing EndRegionImage
Jamp-vancomycinPowder, for solutionIntravenousJamp Pharma Corporation2014-09-22Not applicableCanada flag
Jamp-vancomycinCapsuleOralJamp Pharma Corporation2014-03-26Not applicableCanada flag
Jamp-vancomycinPowder, for solutionIntravenousJamp Pharma Corporation2014-09-22Not applicableCanada flag
Jamp-vancomycinPowder, for solutionIntravenousJamp Pharma Corporation2014-06-06Not applicableCanada flag
Jamp-vancomycinPowder, for solutionIntravenousJamp Pharma Corporation2014-09-22Not applicableCanada flag
Jamp-vancomycinCapsuleOralJamp Pharma Corporation2014-03-26Not applicableCanada flag
Mylan-vancomycin Hydrochloride for Injection, USPPowder, for solutionIntravenousMylan PharmaceuticalsNot applicableNot applicableCanada flag
Mylan-vancomycin Hydrochloride for Injection, USPPowder, for solutionIntravenousMylan PharmaceuticalsNot applicableNot applicableCanada flag
Mylan-vancomycin Hydrochloride for Injection, USPPowder, for solutionIntravenousMylan PharmaceuticalsNot applicableNot applicableCanada flag
Mylan-vancomycin Hydrochloride for Injection, USPPowder, for solutionIntravenousMylan PharmaceuticalsNot applicableNot applicableCanada flag
Additional Data Available
  • Application Number
    Application Number

    A unique ID assigned by the FDA when a product is submitted for approval by the labeller.

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  • Product Code
    Product Code

    A governmentally-recognized ID which uniquely identifies the product within its regulatory market.

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Unapproved/Other Products
NameIngredientsDosageRouteLabellerMarketing StartMarketing EndRegionImage
Vancomycin HClVancomycin hydrochloride (4.2 mg/1mL)Injection, solutionIntravenousCantrell Drug Company2013-05-01Not applicableUS flag
Vancomycin HClVancomycin hydrochloride (6 mg/1mL)Injection, solutionIntravenousCantrell Drug Company2012-05-25Not applicableUS flag
Vancomycin HClVancomycin hydrochloride (5 mg/1mL)Injection, solutionIntravenousCantrell Drug Company2013-08-30Not applicableUS flag

Categories

ATC Codes
J01XA01 — VancomycinA07AA09 — VancomycinS01AA28 — Vancomycin
Drug Categories
Chemical TaxonomyProvided by Classyfire
Description
This compound belongs to the class of organic compounds known as cyclic peptides. These are compounds containing a cyclic moiety bearing a peptide backbone.
Kingdom
Organic compounds
Super Class
Organic acids and derivatives
Class
Carboxylic acids and derivatives
Sub Class
Amino acids, peptides, and analogues
Direct Parent
Cyclic peptides
Alternative Parents
Aminoglycosides / Phenolic glycosides / Diarylethers / Disaccharides / O-glycosyl compounds / Alpha amino acids and derivatives / 1-hydroxy-2-unsubstituted benzenoids / 1-hydroxy-4-unsubstituted benzenoids / Aryl chlorides / Oxanes
show 19 more
Substituents
1,2-aminoalcohol / 1-hydroxy-2-unsubstituted benzenoid / 1-hydroxy-4-unsubstituted benzenoid / Acetal / Alcohol / Alpha-amino acid or derivatives / Amine / Amino acid / Amino acid or derivatives / Amino saccharide
show 40 more
Molecular Framework
Aromatic heteropolycyclic compounds
External Descriptors
glycopeptide (CHEBI:28001)

Chemical Identifiers

UNII
6Q205EH1VU
CAS number
1404-90-6
InChI Key
MYPYJXKWCTUITO-LYRMYLQWSA-N
InChI
InChI=1S/C66H75Cl2N9O24/c1-23(2)12-34(71-5)58(88)76-49-51(83)26-7-10-38(32(67)14-26)97-40-16-28-17-41(55(40)101-65-56(54(86)53(85)42(22-78)99-65)100-44-21-66(4,70)57(87)24(3)96-44)98-39-11-8-27(15-33(39)68)52(84)50-63(93)75-48(64(94)95)31-18-29(79)19-37(81)45(31)30-13-25(6-9-36(30)80)46(60(90)77-50)74-61(91)47(28)73-59(89)35(20-43(69)82)72-62(49)92/h6-11,13-19,23-24,34-35,42,44,46-54,56-57,65,71,78-81,83-87H,12,20-22,70H2,1-5H3,(H2,69,82)(H,72,92)(H,73,89)(H,74,91)(H,75,93)(H,76,88)(H,77,90)(H,94,95)/t24-,34+,35-,42+,44-,46+,47+,48-,49+,50-,51+,52+,53+,54-,56+,57+,65-,66-/m0/s1
IUPAC Name
(1S,2R,18R,19R,22S,25R,28R,40S)-48-{[(2S,3R,4S,5S,6R)-3-{[(2S,4S,5S,6S)-4-amino-5-hydroxy-4,6-dimethyloxan-2-yl]oxy}-4,5-dihydroxy-6-(hydroxymethyl)oxan-2-yl]oxy}-22-(carbamoylmethyl)-5,47-dichloro-2,18,32,35,37-pentahydroxy-19-[(2R)-4-methyl-2-(methylamino)pentanamido]-20,23,26,42,44-pentaoxo-7,13-dioxa-21,24,27,41,43-pentaazaoctacyclo[26.14.2.2³,⁶.2¹⁴,¹⁷.1⁸,¹².1²⁹,³³.0¹⁰,²⁵.0³⁴,³⁹]pentaconta-3,5,8,10,12(48),14,16,29(45),30,32,34,36,38,46,49-pentadecaene-40-carboxylic acid
SMILES
CN[[email protected]](CC(C)C)C(=O)N[[email protected]@H]1[[email protected]](O)C2=CC=C(OC3=C(O[[email protected]@H]4O[[email protected]](CO)[[email protected]@H](O)[[email protected]](O)[[email protected]]4O[[email protected]]4C[[email protected]](C)(N)[[email protected]](O)[[email protected]](C)O4)C4=CC(=C3)[[email protected]@H](NC(=O)[[email protected]](CC(N)=O)NC1=O)C(=O)N[[email protected]@H]1C3=CC(=C(O)C=C3)C3=C(O)C=C(O)C=C3[[email protected]](NC(=O)[[email protected]@H](NC1=O)[[email protected]](O)C1=CC(Cl)=C(O4)C=C1)C(O)=O)C(Cl)=C2

References

Synthesis Reference

Boger DL. Vancomycin, teicoplanin, and ramoplanin: synthetic and mechanistic studies. Med Res Rev. 2001 Sep;21(5):356-81. Pubmed

General References
  1. Levine DP: Vancomycin: a history. Clin Infect Dis. 2006 Jan 1;42 Suppl 1:S5-12. [PubMed:16323120]
  2. Small PM, Chambers HF: Vancomycin for Staphylococcus aureus endocarditis in intravenous drug users. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1990 Jun;34(6):1227-31. [PubMed:2393284]
  3. Gonzalez C, Rubio M, Romero-Vivas J, Gonzalez M, Picazo JJ: Bacteremic pneumonia due to Staphylococcus aureus: A comparison of disease caused by methicillin-resistant and methicillin-susceptible organisms. Clin Infect Dis. 1999 Nov;29(5):1171-7. [PubMed:10524959]
  4. Sivagnanam S, Deleu D: Red man syndrome. Crit Care. 2003 Apr;7(2):119-20. Epub 2002 Dec 23. [PubMed:12720556]
  5. Cantu TG, Yamanaka-Yuen NA, Lietman PS: Serum vancomycin concentrations: reappraisal of their clinical value. Clin Infect Dis. 1994 Apr;18(4):533-43. [PubMed:8038306]
  6. Rybak MJ: The pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of vancomycin. Clin Infect Dis. 2006 Jan 1;42 Suppl 1:S35-9. doi: 10.1086/491712. [PubMed:16323118]
  7. Butterfield JM, Patel N, Pai MP, Rosano TG, Drusano GL, Lodise TP: Refining vancomycin protein binding estimates: identification of clinical factors that influence protein binding. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2011 Sep;55(9):4277-82. doi: 10.1128/AAC.01674-10. Epub 2011 Jun 13. [PubMed:21670191]
  8. Matzke GR, Zhanel GG, Guay DR: Clinical pharmacokinetics of vancomycin. Clin Pharmacokinet. 1986 Jul-Aug;11(4):257-82. doi: 10.2165/00003088-198611040-00001. [PubMed:3530582]
  9. CutisPharma Announces FDA Approval of Firvanq (vancomycin) for Treatment of Clostridium Difficile Associated Diarrhea and Staphylococcus Aureus Colitis [Link]
Human Metabolome Database
HMDB0014653
KEGG Drug
D00212
KEGG Compound
C06689
PubChem Compound
14969
PubChem Substance
46505261
ChemSpider
14253
BindingDB
50335519
RxNav
11124
ChEBI
28001
ChEMBL
CHEMBL262777
Therapeutic Targets Database
DAP001330
PharmGKB
PA451850
RxList
RxList Drug Page
Drugs.com
Drugs.com Drug Page
Wikipedia
Vancomycin
AHFS Codes
  • 08:12.28.16 — Glycopeptides
FDA label
Download (57.8 KB)
MSDS
Download (73 KB)

Clinical Trials

Clinical Trials
PhaseStatusPurposeConditionsCount
4Active Not RecruitingOtherClostridium Difficile Infection (CDI) / Diarrhea1
4Active Not RecruitingPreventionSpinal Fusion Acquired1
4Active Not RecruitingTreatmentClostridium / Difficile / Fidaxomicin / Novel Coronavirus Infectious Disease (COVID-19) / Vancomycin1
4Active Not RecruitingTreatmentExacerbation of Ulcerative Colitis / Granulomatous Colitis / Ulcerative Colitis, Active Severe1
4CompletedNot AvailableStaphylococcus Aureus1
4CompletedBasic ScienceCellulitis1
4CompletedBasic ScienceMicrobial Colonization1
4CompletedPreventionAortic Valve Disorder / Congenital Heart Disease (CHD)1
4CompletedPreventionArrhythmia2
4CompletedPreventionCalcium Nephrolithiasis / Urinary Tract Infection1

Pharmacoeconomics

Manufacturers
  • Viropharma inc
  • Lederle parenterals inc
  • Baxter healthcare corp
  • Baxter healthcare corp anesthesia and critical care
  • Akorn strides llc
  • App pharmaceuticals llc
  • Bioniche pharma usa llc
  • Hospira inc
  • Sandoz inc
  • Pharmacia and upjohn co
Packagers
  • ACS Dobfar SPA
  • Akorn Inc.
  • Amerisource Health Services Corp.
  • APP Pharmaceuticals
  • Baxter International Inc.
  • Cardinal Health
  • General Injectables and Vaccines Inc.
  • Generamedix Inc.
  • Hospira Inc.
  • Medisca Inc.
  • Mustafa Nevzat Ilac Sanayii AS
  • Neuman Distributors Inc.
  • Norwich Pharmaceuticals Inc.
  • Pharmedium
  • Sandoz
  • Strides Arcolab Limited
  • Viropharma Inc.
Dosage Forms
FormRouteStrength
InjectionIntravenous1 g
InjectionIntravenous500 mg
Powder
KitOral1 g/1g
CapsuleOral
CapsuleOral250 MG
PowderOral1 G
Powder, for solutionOral500 MG
Powder, for solutionOral1 G
Injection, powder, lyophilized, for solutionIntravenous5 g/100mL
Injection, powder, lyophilized, for solutionIntravenous500 mg/10mL
Injection, powder, lyophilized, for solutionIntravenous512.571 mg
Injection1000 mg
Injection500 mg
Injection, powder, for solutionIntravenous500 mg
CapsuleOral125 mg/1
CapsuleOral250 mg/1
SolutionOral1 g
SolutionOral500 mg
Capsule125 mg
PowderIntravenous
Injection, powder, for solutionOral; Parenteral500 MG
Powder, for solution1 G
Powder, for solutionIntravenous; Oral500 mg
Injection, powder, for solutionIntravenous
Injection, powder, for solutionIntravenous1 g
InjectionIntravenous1000 mg
Injection, powder, for solutionIntravenous5 g
Injection, powder, lyophilized, for solutionIntravenous1000 mg
Injection, powder, lyophilized, for solutionIntravenous500 mg
Capsule250 MG
Injection, powder, for solutionIntravenous; Oral1 g
Injection, powder, for solutionIntravenous; Oral500 mg
Powder, for solution500 MG
Injection, powder, lyophilized, for solutionIntravenous1 g
Injection, solutionIntravenous1.25 g/250mL
Injection, solutionIntravenous1.5 g/300mL
Injection, solutionIntravenous1.75 g/350mL
Injection, solutionIntravenous2 g/400mL
Solution / dropsOphthalmic5 g/100mL
SolutionOral1000 mg
CapsuleOral125 mg
Injection, solutionIntravenous4.2 mg/1mL
Injection, solutionIntravenous5 mg/1mL
Injection, solutionIntravenous6 mg/1mL
Injection, powder, for solutionParenteral1000 mg
Injection, powder, for solutionParenteral500 mg
InjectionIntravenous10 g/100mL
InjectionIntravenous5 g/100mL
Injection, powder, for solution
Injection, powder, for solutionIntravenous1 g/1
Injection, powder, for solutionIntravenous10 g/1
Injection, powder, for solutionIntravenous5 g/1
Injection, powder, for solutionIntravenous500 mg/1
Injection, powder, lyophilized, for solutionIntravenous1 g/20mL
Injection, powder, lyophilized, for solutionIntravenous1 g/10mL
Injection, powder, lyophilized, for solutionIntravenous1 g/1
Injection, powder, lyophilized, for solutionIntravenous1 g/8mL
Injection, powder, lyophilized, for solutionIntravenous1 g/250mL
Injection, powder, lyophilized, for solutionIntravenous1.25 g/25mL
Injection, powder, lyophilized, for solutionIntravenous1.5 g/30mL
Injection, powder, lyophilized, for solutionIntravenous10 g/1
Injection, powder, lyophilized, for solutionIntravenous10 g/100mL
Injection, powder, lyophilized, for solutionIntravenous100 g/1
Injection, powder, lyophilized, for solutionIntravenous100 mg/1mL
Injection, powder, lyophilized, for solutionIntravenous250 mg/5mL
Injection, powder, lyophilized, for solutionIntravenous5 g/1
Injection, powder, lyophilized, for solutionIntravenous500 mg/1
Injection, powder, lyophilized, for solutionIntravenous500 mg/4mL
Injection, powder, lyophilized, for solutionIntravenous500 mg/100mL
Injection, powder, lyophilized, for solutionIntravenous750 mg/1
Injection, powder, lyophilized, for solutionIntravenous750 mg/15mL
Injection, solutionIntravenous1 g/200mL
Injection, solutionIntravenous1 g/1
Injection, solutionIntravenous500 mg/1
Injection, solutionIntravenous500 mg/100mL
Injection, solutionIntravenous750 mg/150mL
PowderNot applicable1 g/1g
Powder, for solutionOral250 mg/5mL
Powder, for solutionIntravenous
Injection, powder, lyophilized, for solutionIntravenous10 g/80mL
SolutionIntravenous
Injection, powder, lyophilized, for solutionIntravenous0.5 gr
Injection, powder, lyophilized, for solutionIntravenous1 gr
Powder, for solutionOral; Parenteral1 G
Powder, for solutionOral; Parenteral500 MG
Capsule, coatedOral125 mg
Capsule, coatedOral250 mg
Injection, solutionIntravenous1000 mg
Injection, solutionIntravenous500 mg
SolutionIntravenous; Oral0.5 g
SolutionIntravenous; Oral1 g
Injection
Powder, for solutionOral; Parenteral1000 MG
Prices
Unit descriptionCostUnit
Vancocin HCl 20 250 mg capsule Box1019.87USD box
Vancomycin hcl powder85.68USD g
Pms-Vancomycin 1 g/vial61.98USD vial
Vancocin hcl 250 mg pulvule40.97USD each
Pms-Vancomycin 500 mg/vial32.62USD vial
Vancocin HCl 125 mg capsule27.66USD capsule
Vancocin hcl 125 mg pulvule22.22USD each
Vancomycin 1 gm vial7.0USD vial
Vancomycin hcl 750 mg vial5.72USD vial
Vancomycin 500 mg vial3.74USD vial
Vancomycin-ns 1.5 g/150 ml0.24USD ml
Vancomycin-ns 1.25 g/150 ml0.21USD ml
Vancomycin hcl 1 g/200 ml bag0.17USD ml
DrugBank does not sell nor buy drugs. Pricing information is supplied for informational purposes only.
Patents
Patent NumberPediatric ExtensionApprovedExpires (estimated)Region
US10188697No2019-01-292035-11-06US flag
US10039804No2018-08-072035-11-06US flag
US10493028No2019-12-032035-03-13US flag
US10688046No2015-03-132035-03-13US flag
Additional Data Available
  • Filed On
    Filed On

    The date on which a patent was filed with the relevant government.

    Learn more

Properties

State
Solid
Experimental Properties
PropertyValueSource
logP-3.1Not Available
Predicted Properties
PropertyValueSource
Water Solubility0.225 mg/mLALOGPS
logP1.11ALOGPS
logP-4.4ChemAxon
logS-3.8ALOGPS
pKa (Strongest Acidic)2.99ChemAxon
pKa (Strongest Basic)9.93ChemAxon
Physiological Charge1ChemAxon
Hydrogen Acceptor Count24ChemAxon
Hydrogen Donor Count19ChemAxon
Polar Surface Area530.49 Å2ChemAxon
Rotatable Bond Count13ChemAxon
Refractivity346.61 m3·mol-1ChemAxon
Polarizability138.7 Å3ChemAxon
Number of Rings10ChemAxon
Bioavailability0ChemAxon
Rule of FiveNoChemAxon
Ghose FilterNoChemAxon
Veber's RuleNoChemAxon
MDDR-like RuleYesChemAxon
Predicted ADMET Features
PropertyValueProbability
Human Intestinal Absorption-0.7876
Blood Brain Barrier-0.991
Caco-2 permeable-0.7094
P-glycoprotein substrateSubstrate0.8562
P-glycoprotein inhibitor INon-inhibitor0.8781
P-glycoprotein inhibitor IINon-inhibitor0.9636
Renal organic cation transporterNon-inhibitor0.9503
CYP450 2C9 substrateNon-substrate0.8535
CYP450 2D6 substrateNon-substrate0.8323
CYP450 3A4 substrateSubstrate0.6686
CYP450 1A2 substrateNon-inhibitor0.9046
CYP450 2C9 inhibitorNon-inhibitor0.9071
CYP450 2D6 inhibitorNon-inhibitor0.9231
CYP450 2C19 inhibitorNon-inhibitor0.9026
CYP450 3A4 inhibitorNon-inhibitor0.8309
CYP450 inhibitory promiscuityLow CYP Inhibitory Promiscuity0.7268
Ames testNon AMES toxic0.5927
CarcinogenicityNon-carcinogens0.8826
BiodegradationNot ready biodegradable1.0
Rat acute toxicity2.5856 LD50, mol/kg Not applicable
hERG inhibition (predictor I)Weak inhibitor0.9987
hERG inhibition (predictor II)Non-inhibitor0.8098
ADMET data is predicted using admetSAR, a free tool for evaluating chemical ADMET properties. (23092397)

Spectra

Mass Spec (NIST)
Not Available
Spectra
SpectrumSpectrum TypeSplash Key
Predicted MS/MS Spectrum - 10V, Positive (Annotated)Predicted LC-MS/MSNot Available
Predicted MS/MS Spectrum - 20V, Positive (Annotated)Predicted LC-MS/MSNot Available
Predicted MS/MS Spectrum - 40V, Positive (Annotated)Predicted LC-MS/MSNot Available
Predicted MS/MS Spectrum - 10V, Negative (Annotated)Predicted LC-MS/MSNot Available
Predicted MS/MS Spectrum - 20V, Negative (Annotated)Predicted LC-MS/MSNot Available
Predicted MS/MS Spectrum - 40V, Negative (Annotated)Predicted LC-MS/MSNot Available
MS/MS Spectrum - DI-ESI-Ion Trap , PositiveLC-MS/MSNot Available
MS/MS Spectrum - DI-ESI-Hybrid FT , PositiveLC-MS/MSNot Available

Targets

1. D-Ala-D-Ala moiety of NAM/NAG peptide subunits of peptidoglycan
Kind
Group
Organism
Gram-positive Bacteria
Pharmacological action
Yes
Actions
Ligand
References
  1. Reynolds PE: Structure, biochemistry and mechanism of action of glycopeptide antibiotics. Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 1989 Nov;8(11):943-50. [PubMed:2532132]
  2. Reynolds PE, Somner EA: Comparison of the target sites and mechanisms of action of glycopeptide and lipoglycodepsipeptide antibiotics. Drugs Exp Clin Res. 1990;16(8):385-9. [PubMed:2151441]
  3. Boger DL: Vancomycin, teicoplanin, and ramoplanin: synthetic and mechanistic studies. Med Res Rev. 2001 Sep;21(5):356-81. [PubMed:11579438]

Carriers

Details
1. Serum albumin
Kind
Protein
Organism
Humans
Pharmacological action
No
Actions
Substrate
General Function
Toxic substance binding
Specific Function
Serum albumin, the main protein of plasma, has a good binding capacity for water, Ca(2+), Na(+), K(+), fatty acids, hormones, bilirubin and drugs. Its main function is the regulation of the colloid...
Gene Name
ALB
Uniprot ID
P02768
Uniprot Name
Serum albumin
Molecular Weight
69365.94 Da
References
  1. Baneres-Roquet F, Gualtieri M, Villain-Guillot P, Pugniere M, Leonetti JP: Use of a surface plasmon resonance method to investigate antibiotic and plasma protein interactions. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2009 Apr;53(4):1528-31. doi: 10.1128/AAC.00971-08. Epub 2009 Jan 21. [PubMed:19164148]
Kind
Protein group
Organism
Humans
Pharmacological action
No
Actions
Substrate
General Function
Not Available
Specific Function
Functions as transport protein in the blood stream. Binds various ligands in the interior of its beta-barrel domain. Also binds synthetic drugs and influences their distribution and availability in...

Components:
References
  1. Baneres-Roquet F, Gualtieri M, Villain-Guillot P, Pugniere M, Leonetti JP: Use of a surface plasmon resonance method to investigate antibiotic and plasma protein interactions. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2009 Apr;53(4):1528-31. doi: 10.1128/AAC.00971-08. Epub 2009 Jan 21. [PubMed:19164148]
Kind
Protein
Organism
Mouse
Pharmacological action
No
Actions
Substrate
General Function
In peripheral tissues, the H1 subclass of histamine receptors mediates the contraction of smooth muscles, increase in capillary permeability due to contraction of terminal venules, and catecholamine release from adrenal medulla, as well as mediating neurotransmission in the central nervous system. Involved in circadian rhythm of locomotor activity and exploratory behavior. Also involved in responsiveness to pertussis toxin through its control of susceptibility to histamine hypersensitivity and enhancement of antigen-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity responses.
Specific Function
Calcium ion transmembrane transporter activity
Gene Name
Hrh1
Uniprot ID
P70174
Uniprot Name
Histamine H1 receptor
Molecular Weight
55681.225 Da
References
  1. Baneres-Roquet F, Gualtieri M, Villain-Guillot P, Pugniere M, Leonetti JP: Use of a surface plasmon resonance method to investigate antibiotic and plasma protein interactions. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2009 Apr;53(4):1528-31. doi: 10.1128/AAC.00971-08. Epub 2009 Jan 21. [PubMed:19164148]

Drug created on June 13, 2005 07:24 / Updated on October 19, 2020 07:46

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